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Acupuncture Cam Therapy Institute | Himalayan Institute of Acupuncture and Complementary Medicines (HIACM India) is an Internationally associated Institute of Acupuncture and Complementary Medicine based in the picturesque valley of Dehradun in the Himalayan foothills of India.

Dehradun Acupuncture Institute India conducts courses in complementary alternative medicines conducts courses in ayurveda, acupuncture, acupressure, astrology, yoga, alternative medicine, complementary medicines and also does research and development (R & D) in alternative medicines, acupuncture, alternative medicine, camtherapy, yoga, complementary medicine, complementary alternative medicine and other associated medical sciences.

Acupuncture Cam Therapy Institute India, run under the aegis of the International Himalayan Institute of Acupuncture and Complementary Medicines, is located at Dehradun in Uttaranchal|Uttarakhand, India. Its acupuncturists and doctors conduct medical sciences courses in Ayurveda, acupuncture healing, acupressure, Vedic astrology, yoga therapies, alternative medicine and also do research and development (R & D) in complementary medicine, alternative medicines, herbal medicine and ayurvedic cancer cure and treatment.

Acupuncture CAM Therapy Institute of Acupuncture & Complementary Medicines is located at Dehradun, India. It conducts courses in Ayurveda, acupuncture, acupressure, Vedic astrology, Yoga , complementary medicine and alternative medicine under the aegis of Himalayan Institute of Acupuncture and Complementary Medicines.

 
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Shen Nung is worshiped by native Chinese Drug Guilds as their patron God.

Pharmacy In Ancient China

Chinese Pharmacy, according to legend, stems from Shen Nung (about 2000 B.C.), emperor who sought out and investigated the medicinal value of several hundred herbs. He is reputed to have tested many of them on himself, and to have written the first Pen T-Sao, or native herbal, recording 365 drugs.

Still worshiped by native Chinese drug guilds as their patron god, Shen Nung conceivably examined many herbs, barks, and roots brought in from the fields, swamps, and woods that are still recognized in Pharmacy today.

In the background is the "Pa Kua," a mathematical design symbolizing creation and life. Medicinal plants include podophyllum, rhubarb, ginseng, stramonium, cinnamon bark, and, in the boy's hand, ma huang, or Ephedra.
 
 

Traditional Chinese Medicine treatments work on the basis of individualised formulae for each patient.

Traditional Chinese Medicine

Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) is a highly evolved system of healing that was developed in China several thousand years ago. It is based on the concept that laws of nature can be used to understand the inner workings of the body. Like the universe, our health is subject to opposite forces such as heat and cold, masculine and feminine, joy and sadness.

Imbalances in our bodies manifest themselves as diseases. They block the flow of energy (chi) traveling through our bodies. Acupuncture, acupressure, and herbs can help unblock the chi and bring the body into harmony and wellness.


Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) is a system of primary health care that includes acupuncture, Chinese herbal medicine, remedial massage (anmo tuina), exercise and breathing therapy (such as qigong), and diet and lifestyle advice.

Traditional Chinese Medicine has an uninterrupted history of development in China and other parts of East Asia dating back thousands of years. The primary feature of modern TCM is the premise that good health relies on the restoration and maintenance of harmony, balance and order to the individual.

TCM takes a wholistic approach to understanding normal function and disease processes and focuses as much on the prevention of illness as it does on the treatment.

 
When healthy, an abundant supply of qi (pronounced chee) or "life energy" flows through the body's meridians (a network of invisible channels through the body). If the flow of qi in the meridians becomes blocked or there is an inadequate supply of qi, then the body fails to maintain harmony, balance and order, and disease or illness follows. This can result from stress, overwork, poor diet, disease pathogens, weather and environmental conditions, and other lifestyle factors and becomes evident to TCM practitioners through identifiable signs of body dysfunction. TCM practitioners look carefully for these signs of health and dysfunction, paying particular attention to not only the presenting condition, but also the medical history, general constitution, and the pulse and tongue.

Clinical assessment, diagnosis, and treatment principles are based on the theoretical frameworks of TCM which seeks to identify underlying symptom patterns that indicate how the body is or has become dysfunctional. Treatment is focussed on the underlying condition as well as treating the presenting symptoms. Clinical decision-making and patient management strategies are also influenced by contemporary Western approaches to health care, including infection control practices and known interactions of herbal medicines with pharmaceuticals and other therapuitic substances.

TCM treatments work on the basis of individualised formulae for each patient.
 

Chinese Chop
There are over 450 substances commonly used in Chinese herbal medicine

Chinese Herbal Medicine

Chinese herbal medicine is part of an integrated system of primary health care, known as Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) that has an uninterrupted history of development dating back thousands of years in China and other parts of East Asia.

The origins of Chinese herbal medicine in China can be traced back at least five thousand years, making it one of the oldest and most long-standing health care systems in the world.

In the intervening millennia, the practice of Chinese herbal medicine and TCM has developed and matured to become what it is today - a natural and wholistic system of primary health care that is being used by people from a wide range of cultural and social backgrounds to effectively treat a wide range of chronic and acute health problems.

Chinese herbal medicine takes an wholistic approach to understanding normal function and disease processes and focuses as much on the prevention of illness as on the treatment.

Most diseases or illnesses present with a core set of recognisable signs and symptoms, but the actual presentation of a particular disease or illness will vary from person to person. For this reason, people with similar health conditions may be provided with quite different Chinese herbal medicine prescriptions.

A qualified practitioner is able to prescribe a Chinese herbal formula that specifically matches and treats your individual health problem. As your condition changes and improves with treatment, the Chinese herbal treatment is also adjusted and modified until the desired health outcome is achieved.

Today, there are over 450 substances commonly used in Chinese herbal medicine - most are of plant origin though some animal and mineral substances may also be used. You may find some in your kitchen, such as ginger, garlic and cinnamon, while others such as chrysanthemum and peony flowers, are more likely to be found in your garden! Many of the substances used will be unfamiliar to you and have names like chai hu (bupleurum), di huang (rehmannia), and huang qi (astragalus). Some substances that were used traditionally are no longer part of modern professional Chinese herbal medicine practice. For example, traditional remedies that are derived from endangered species have been replaced by other substances with similar actions.

Chinese herbal medicines are prescribed either singly or made into formulae which take into account the individual therapeutic action of each herb and well as the effects when combined together. A well constructed formula maximises the effectiveness for treating a particular condition, while counteracting and minimising the unwanted effects of an individual herb.

In addition to providing effective treatment for a wide range of health disorders, Chinese herbal medicine may also be used to assist with general health maintenance and disease prevention. By strengthening and enhancing normal body functions, the immune system is boosted and a general sense of well-being promoted.

A snapshot of conditions typically treated with Chinese Herbal Medicine includes:
Insomnia and fatigue
Loss of appetite and common digestive disorders
Constipation and diarrhoea
Irritable bowel syndrome
Common cold and influenza
Chronic headaches
Skin disorders
Fluid retention
Anxiety, depression and stress
Allergies
Rheumatoid and osteoarthritis
Premenstrual syndrome and painful menstruation
Excessive menstruation
Infertility
Impotence and prostate disorders
Disorders associated with menopause

All text is available under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License. Some of the contents herein are available under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License.